Leadership

Vision, communication & flexibility = best bosses

When choosing the boss most Australian’s want to work for – the top five traits survey respondents cited were speaking to staff regularly, offering and supporting more flexible ways of working, having a good attitude and vision and demonstrating innovation.Alan Joyce, CEO, Qantas was number one on the list.

The findings were published in the AFR, 21 March 2017. Read more: http://www.afr.com/leadership/alan-joyce-voted-australias-top-ceo-20170224-gukxdt#ixzz4c20NWpVE


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Lisa Chung speaks to Sydney leaders

Great event today hearing from Lisa Chung about her career and leadership roles at our Sydney Leaders Lunch. The room of board directors, CEOs and executive mentors and mentees all joined Lisa in a stimulating discussion on leadership and the key issues faced in their sector. The event follows the McCarthy Mentoring Newcastle and Brisbane Leaders Lunches in the past two months.

 

 

 

 

 


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Have “that conversation”: the simplest way to keep your most valuable people

Last week my colleague asked a new client why he was initiating a mentoring program for his firm. He said that he didn’t want to lose his best people simply because no one had had “that conversation”.

She was perplexed “What conversation?”

He explained that when he was a busy senior associate, working long hours and billing above expectations he felt unrecognised and after several job offers from other firms offered his resignation. Clearly they didn’t want him, no one had ever discussed partnership with him and others were making him offers.  The partners of the firm were shocked and immediately made a counter offer.  They claimed they had identified his leadership potential and had been discussing his move to partnership for months; however no one had shared this with him. They’d never had “that conversation”.

Perhaps it was his role to ask the partners for a meeting to discuss his future. Did he think it was inappropriate?  There are some workplace cultures that do not encourage this kind of initiative and employees wait for someone to invite them to have “that conversation”.

He vowed he’d never let this happen in an organisation he ran so ten years on and as Managing Partner, he is offering early career lawyers a more formal channel to discuss and plan their career paths – a mentoring program.

This story highlights some interesting issues that we see recur in so many organisations and are much discussed in mentoring relationships. The grey area of how to secure a promotion, or even discuss your career with your manager, if they never do.  Will you be perceived as pushy and self-promoting or are you missing an opportunity if you don’t take the initiative?

The blunt answer is that no one cares more about your career more than you do, so my advice is to take action and arrange a meeting. In the Managing Partner’s case there was no hidden agenda, the partners just hadn’t discussed their thoughts with him.

Organisations need to ensure there is a transparent process and that it’s someone’s role to recognise and reward their best people. It would seem the natural responsibility of a manager, but somehow it eludes many of us and organisations leak talented, valuable and expensive people for a completely preventable reason.

The 2016 Deloitte Millennial Survey (sample of 7700 people born after 1982 and based around the world) found that 1 in 4 employees during the next year ‘would quit his or her current employer to join a new organisation or to do something different. That figure increases to 44% when the time frame is expanded to two years’. More concerning is that ‘the least loyal employees are more likely to say that “I’m being overlooked for leadership positions and “My leadership skills are not being fully developed”.   Is this impatience or a sign of neglect?

On the flip side, some organisations really get this stuff right, as they know one of the top reasons people quit their jobs is lack of opportunity to advance and turnover costs are often estimated to be 100% – 300% of that employee’s base salary. Effective leaders know through experience that they can only deliver their vision with the right team around them.  They identify and develop talented people.  They extend them and help them see new and different opportunities and career paths.  They take an interest in their people, listen, understand and support their ambitions. They have “that conversation” and ask people:

  • What’s your career path?
  • Do you see a future for yourself in this business?
  • How can you contribute?
  • What’s your next role? Do you have a plan to get there?
  • How can I help you achieve that?

So if you consider yourself an effective leader or want to be one, then keeping your best performers should be on your “to do” list. You need to be personally involved in and have some understanding of how talent systems work in your organisation. It’s not just HR’s job. These questions might be useful to think about:

  1. How do you identify your top talent?
  2. Can you nominate your next leaders for critical roles?
  3. Are those people aware that they are on a talent list?
  4. How do you develop talent or your high potential people? Leadership & mentoring programs, 360, further study, secondments, sponsors.
  5. Do you have any key challenges in retaining these people?
  6. Do you have a diverse talent pool?
  7. As a leader in your organisation how can you affect these issues?

Organisations are about people and sometimes it’s the simplest gestures, like a regular conversation, that are important.

by Sophie McCarthy, Executive Director


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Saluting Sydney Women: tribute to Wendy McCarthy AO

Proud to be part of the Sydney Women’s Fund special event honouring Wendy McCarthy AO, our business founder, educator, change-agent, company director, “disrupter” and mentor to many.

Close friend the Hon Dame Quentin Bryce led the tributes, warmly describing Wendy as a evangelist, promoter and persuader – one who has fought hard for women’s and children’s rights, shaken the status-quo and has supported so many in their careers and lives.

Continuing to inspire, Wendy discussed the power of friendships and passion, the importance of saying yes to opportunities and the critical role of education in lifting women out of poverty and disadvantage – “it’s the one thing that no one can ever take away”.

 

 

 


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Executive development for property leaders

Applications are now open for the UDIA NSW Executive Mentoring Program for leaders working in the property sector. Managed by McCarthy Mentoring the program offers talented industry specialists a unique professional development opportunity to work one2one with an experienced executive. Mentors will draw on their experience in business and as company directors in the sector to provide confidential advice and support. Participants will also be invited to exclusive networking events with program alumni and peers.

Research shows that mentoring is a strategic way for organisations to engage, retain and develop talented people. It also helps to manage succession planning, increase cross-organisation and industry communication, broaden networks as well as develop a culture of mentoring within the urban development industry.

The UDIA NSW Executive Mentoring Program is specifically designed to assist with:

  • Talent retention – recognise and engage high performing employees
  • Executive development – strengthening leadership capabilities

For the participants, the 12 month mentoring program offers:

  • Chance for reflection and clarity around professional and personal goals
  • one-to-one support and advice from some of the industry’s most respected leaders
  • Support to gain further confidence and become more effective leaders
  • Insights into effective stakeholder management and communication
  • Chance for reflection and clarity around professional and personal goals
  • Expanded professional networks and increased industry profile
  • Exclusive access to events with current participants and program alumni

Applications

Applications close Monday 12th September. Full details and applications forms are available here.

Who should apply

Talented professionals who are currently employed at a member organisation with 10 -15 years industry experience, a track record of achievement and the aspiration to be a future leader in the sector.

 


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