Books

Having a Working Mum is Good for You

leadership mentoring

This month Harvard Business Review put out a media release announcing new research that looked at the outcomes for adults raised by working mothers. It found that women do better in the workplace if they had a mum who worked outside the home before they were 14 years old. Specifically, they performed better, earned more and had more powerful positions. Men didn’t change in that they were as likely as sons with stay-at-home mothers to hold supervisory positions and earn comparable salaries. They did however, contribute more at home.

The findings were based on a survey of 50,000 adults aged 18 to 60 in 25 nations worldwide in 2002 and 2012

Read full media release Having a Working Mother is Good for You, Harvard Business Review, 18 May 2015

 


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Sandberg: “mentoring is crucial for career progression”

executive mentoring

In her latest exciting book, Lean In, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg explores the complexity around why we have too few women leaders and offers some strong pieces of advice. In her dedicated chapter on mentoring, she states “mentoring is crucial for career progression.” However she also argues that you can’t just ask someone – it has to be a recipical relationship and the strongest ones “spring from a real and often earned connection felt by both sides.”

Read chapter “Are You My Mentor”, Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg here.

Book overview from post 3 April, 2013: 

Lean In. Women Work and the Will to Lead is Sheryl Sandberg’s exciting new book. Based on the huge success of her 2010 TED talk about why we have too few women leaders, now viewed by over 2 million people this is a must read.  Sheryl Sandberg is the COO of Facebook and has an impeccable resume, Harvard business school, McKinseys, researcher for the World Bank, Google and then Facebook.  Like many before her she asks the question where are the women in leadership?  We were all at university together, started careers as peers and then something happened…It is this more complex area that she examines and offers three strong pieces of advice. First, make your partner a real partner and share parenting and domestic commitments. Second, don’t leave before you leave -stay engaged with your career when you are thinking of starting a family and don’t say no to opportunities, you can be a mother and have a career, men don’t give it a second thought and finally, sit at the table, own your success, don’t apologise for being acknowledged and be a part of the decision making in your organisation.

This is a powerful and inspiring story, with great insights and sage advice on how to be a successful female leader in 2013.  Compulsory reading.


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